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Turquois Work of Hawikuh, New Mexico, Vol. 2 New York Museum of the American Indian

Turquois Work of Hawikuh, New Mexico, Vol. 2

New York Museum of the American Indian

Published September 27th 2015
ISBN : 9781331910817
Paperback
40 pages
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Excerpt from Turquois Work of Hawikuh, New Mexico, Vol. 2It [turquois] has the virtue of soothing the sense of vision and the mind, and of guarding against all external dangers and accidents- it brings happiness and prosperity to the wearer.MoreExcerpt from Turquois Work of Hawikuh, New Mexico, Vol. 2It [turquois] has the virtue of soothing the sense of vision and the mind, and of guarding against all external dangers and accidents- it brings happiness and prosperity to the wearer. Suspended in a glass it sounds the hour. When worn by the immodest, it loses all its power and color. - Mylius, 1618.Turquois has ever been regarded as one of the most valued possessions of the Pueblo Indians, for ornaments fashioned therefrom have been found in numerous prehistoric dwellings of the Southwest and in the graves of their builders, often in such connection as to indicate the sacred character of the material. Doubtless the source of most of the turquois in bothearly and recent times in New Mexico was the Cerrillos mountains, about twenty miles south-southwest of Santa Fe, noted for its extensive pre-Spanish excavations- but other deposits with evidences of ancient working with rude stone tools, as well as the tools themselves, and sherds of corrugated pottery in some cases, have been observed in the Burro and the Little Hachita mountains in Grant county, and in the Jarilla hills in Otero county. Present Zuni knowledge points to Los Cerrillos certainly as the chief source of supply from the earliest times, hence we need not consider here the anciently worked deposits of turquois in Arizona.Quoting Mrs Stevenson, Pogue (p. 124) refers to the legend of the origin of the sacred Salt lake of the Zuni, in which the turquois is personified in the form of Hliakwa (the native name of turquois), who journeyed southwestward from the pueblo of Santo Domingo and made his home in a high mountain protected by many angry white and black bears. Hither the Zuni make pilgrimages today to collect turquoises, which they are supposed to obtain only after the bears are appeased by sacrifice of plumes and sacred meal, brought for that purpose. Then in a note Pogue adds, Concerning the whereabouts of this mountain, Mrs Stevenson says she was bound to secrecy.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.