Home » Our Old Home - And English Note-Books - Vol II by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Our Old Home - And English Note-Books - Vol II Nathaniel Hawthorne

Our Old Home - And English Note-Books - Vol II

Nathaniel Hawthorne

Published February 1st 2008
ISBN : 9781408638439
Paperback
624 pages
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 About the Book 

PASSAGES FROM - THE ENGLISH NOTE-BOOKS. TO THE LAKES. July 4th. - I left Leamington on Monday, shortly after twelve, having been accompanied to the railway station by U-and J-, whom-I sent away before the train started. While I was waiting, a ratherMorePASSAGES FROM - THE ENGLISH NOTE-BOOKS. TO THE LAKES. July 4th. - I left Leamington on Monday, shortly after twelve, having been accompanied to the railway station by U-and J-, whom-I sent away before the train started. While I was waiting, a rather gen- tlemanly, well-to-do, English-looking man sat down by me, and began to talk of the Crimea, of human affairs in general, of God and his Providence, of the coming troubles of the world, and of spiritualism, in a strange free way for an Englishman, or, indeed, for any man. It was easy to see that he was an enthusiast of some hue or other. He being bound for Birmingham and I for Rugby, we soon had to part but he asked my name, and told me his own, which I did not much attend to, and immediately forgot. Here follows a long account of a visit to Lichfield and Uttoxeter, condensed in Our Old Home. July 6th. - The day after my arrival, by way of Lichfield and Uttoxeter, to Liverpool, the door of the Consulate opened, and in came the very sociable personage who accosted me at the railway station at Leamington. He was on his way towards Edinburgh, e 3 L, ., ENeL SH NOTE-BOOKS. r L L f l 855. C ., to cieliveir L t . a course t Q, lectures or a lecture, and had be s id, to G th me about spiritualism, be - . . L I - S s . L b ing desirous of having the judgment of a sincere mind on the subject. In his own mind, I should suppose, he is past the stage of doubt and inquiry for he told me that in every action of his life he is governed by the counsels received from the spirit iawl orld through a medium. I did not inquire whether this medium who is a small boy had suggested his visit to me. My remarks to him were quite of a sceptical character in regard to the faith to which he had surrendered himself. He has formerly lived in America, and had had a son born there. He gave me a pamphlet written by him self, on the cure of consumption and other diseases by antiseptic remedies. I hope he will not bore me any more, though he seems to be a very sincere and good man but these enthusiasts who adopt such extravi gant ideas appear to me to lack ima n, ztion, instead of being misled by it, as they are generally supposed to be. NEWBY BRIDGE. - FOOT OF WINDERJIERE. July 13th. - I left Liverpool on Saturday last, by the London and Northwestern Railway, for Leamington, spent Sunday there, and started on Monday for the English lakes, with the whole family. We should I not have taken this journey just now, but I had an official engagement which it was convenient to combine with a pleasure-excursion. The first night we arrived at Chester, and put up at the Albion Hotel, where we found ourselves very comfortable. We took the rail at twklve the next day, and went as far as Milnethorpe station, where we engaged seats in an old fashiobed itage-coach, and came to Newby Bridge. I suppose there are not many of these coaches now running on any road in Great Britain bat this appears to be the genuine machine, in all respects, and especially in the round, ruddy coachman, well moistened with ale, good-natured, courteous, and with a proper sense of his dignity and important position. U-, J-, and I mounted atop, S-, nurse, and R got inside, and we bowled off merrily towards the hearts of the hills...